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Step 3: Dispute the Copyright Notification

Once that you have determined that your video is in fact fair use, in order to get it restored you will need to dispute the copyright notice. This will be done differently depending on how your video was blocked.

Disputing a Content ID Match - View video tutorial

If your video was blocked by YouTube's automatic Content ID system, you will need to dispute the content identification. To do this, follow the following steps.

  1. Go to your Video Manager page.
  2. Click on Copyright Notices in the left side bar.
  3. Find the video you wish to dispute, and click on the copyright status of the video, where it says something like, "Video blocked in some countries," or "Matched third party content." Note: As far as I know, the new "I acknowledge" button doesn't really do anything, so it doesn't matter if you click it or not.
  4. Scroll down to the bottom of the page, and click the link that says "I believe this copyright claim is not valid."
  5. From the list of reasons, select "My use of the content meets the legal requirements for fair use or fair dealing under applicable copyright laws" (or whatever other option is more suited to your situation). If you believe the Content ID match is simply wrong and your video does not contain any copyrighted content or the particular claimant does not own the copyright to it, select the option that best expresses the reason for your dispute.
  6. On the next page, check the box for "I am sure..." and click continue.
  7. On the next page, type a brief explanation of why you think your video is fair use. When disputing content ID blocks on my anime music videos, I usually say something like, "This video is fair use under U.S. copyright law because it is noncommercial and transformative in nature, uses no more of the original than necessary, and has no negative effect on the market for the original work."
  8. Type your full name (your actual name not your YouTube username) into the signature box.
  9. Check the box where it says you have a good faith belief that the material was disabled as a result of mistake or misidentification and click continue.
  10. On the dispute summary page, click the continue button, and then click ok when it asks you to confirm.
  11. Your video should then be automatically restored and should be viewable more or less immediately, though you may need to refresh the page a few times for it to work.

Go back to your Video Manager page and click on the video's copyright status again, and it should say that you disputed the claim, and it should give a date one month from the day your filed your dispute, by which the copyright holder must review your dispute and decide whether to release their claim or reinstate it.

If the copyright claimant reinstates their claim, your video will be re-blocked or monetized, depending on the policy set by the Content ID system. Until October 2012, this used to be the end of the line and the user was left without further recourse. Recently however, YouTube has implemented a new appeals process, under which you can file a second dispute against a reinstated claim and force the copyright claimant to either release the claim or resort to the DMCA notice and counter-notice process described below.

Appealing a Reinstated Content ID Claim (new as of October 2012) - View video tutorial

The appeals process is basically just a second dispute, telling the copyright claimant you are really serious that your video is not infringing their copyright. While it is yet another hoop to jump through to fight a false copyright claim, it is an improvement over the old system, which gave users essentially no recourse at this point.
  1. If a disputed Content ID claim against a video has been reinstated by the copyright claimant, below the message on the Content ID match page saying the claim has been reinstated, there should be a link that says "I want to appeal a reinstated claim." Click this link and go through the process, following the instructions on each page.
  2. If you have not previously done so, you will be required to verify your YouTube account with a cell phone number capable of receiving text messages before you can proceed with the appeal. If you do not have a cell phone or your cell phone provider is not supported, you may need to buy a prepaid phone from a supported provider to use to verify your account. Once you enter your cell phone number, YouTube will send a verification code via text message to the phone, which you should then enter in the box provided to verify your account.
  3. Once you have verified your account, you will be required to enter your contact information (note: this will be provided to the copyright claimant) and provide a more detailed explanation of why your believe your video is not infringing. If you originally disputed the Content ID claim based on fair use, YouTube is going to make you prove you actually understand fair use by typing out a brief explanation of how your video meets each of the four factors of the statutory fair use test (see the previous section of this tutorial for descriptions of what each factor means). If you originally disputed the claim by saying you have a license to use the content in your video, you will be asked to provide a link to a license contract or other documentation that you have permission to use the content, which you can cut and paste into the provided text box.
  4. Check the acknowledgment at the bottom of the page, type your legal name as your signature, and click Appeal to submit your appeal.
  5. It should now bring you back to the Content ID matches screen. Your video should be viewable again pending the copyright claimant's response to your appeal. As with the original Content ID dispute, they will now have one month to respond (though it will probably be sooner), this time by either releasing their claim or filing a formal DMCA takedown notice. If they do the latter, your video will be removed once more and there will be a copyright strike issued against your account, just as if the video had been blocked by a DMCA notice to begin with. While this may seem like a bad thing, the advantage of this (compared to the way things used to work) is that it also gives you recourse to the DMCA counter-notice process, which is described below.  If you still disagree with the copyright claim, you can file a DMCA counter-notice and have your video restored, in which case the copyright claimant will have to actually sue you in order to get the video removed permanently. See the next section of this tutorial for instructions on how to do that.

One final note about the new appeals process. YouTube has stated that this process will not necessarily be available for every video with a reinstated Content ID claim. You may not be able to appeal reinstated claims if you have outstanding DMCA copyright strikes on your account. Also, from what I have learned, the appeals process does not appear to be available for claims that were reinstated prior to fall of 2012. Assuming that you are otherwise in good copyright standing and the claim was reinstated after YouTube implemented the new policy, the appeals process should be available on all new reinstated claims.

For more information about the new appeals process, please see this YouTube help page, YouTube's blog post about the changes, and my blog post giving my initial reaction to the new system.

Filing a DMCA Counter-notice - View video tutorial

A DMCA takedown notice is a formal notice of copyright infringement by a copyright owner. You should know if your video was taken down as a result of a DMCA takedown notice because you would have gotten an email from YouTube saying that there is now a "strike" against your account, which will also show up in your Account Status page. If this is the case, in order to get your video restored, you will have to file a formal DMCA counter-notice with YouTube.

There are two ways to submit a counter-notice. (1) The easiest and best way is to use YouTube's webform for submitting counter-notices (accessed via your Video Manager page). (2) You can also email your counter-notice to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . If you choose to write a counter-notice yourself and submit it by email, ChillingEffects has an excellent Counter-notice generator, which you can use to generate a counter-notice to email to YouTube.

1. Using YouTube's Counter-Notice Webform (Recommended Method)

The best method to submit counter-notices to YouTube is to use the handy webform YouTube has provided for this purpose.

  1. Go to YouTube's counter-notice webform, which you can reach by going to your Video Manager page or your Copyright Notices page and clicking on the link next to the video that was taken down.
  2. Fill in all the required information. This includes your YouTube screen name, your true legal name and true residential address (note: this information will be sent to the copyright claimant), the email address associated with your YouTube account, the URL of the removed video, and the required statements swearing that your counter-notice is not fraudulent and consenting to the jurisdiction of your local federal district court.
  3. Make sure to provide a justification for why you believe your video is fair use in the "message to YouTube" box. If you do not provide YouTube with a justification stating why you are filing the counter-notice, YouTube will reject your counter-notice without even forwarding it to the copyright holder. This message must be specific to your video. A generic statement describing fair use in general will not suffice. You have to describe why YOUR VIDEO is fair use, or else YouTube will reject your counter-notice. A good basic fair use rationale could be something like, "This video is fair use under U.S. copyright law because it is (1) non-commercial, (2) transformative in nature, (3) uses no more of the original work than necessary for the video's purpose, and (4) does not compete with the original work and could have no negative affect on its market."
  4. Though not required, it is a good idea to include this same statement in the "message to the party that made the copyright claim" box, so they know your reasons for filing a counter-notice as well.
  5. Type your first and last name at the end as your electronic signature and click submit.

2. Alternate Method: Write your own counter-notice

Note: Since YouTube changed submitting DMCA counter-notices to be done through your video manager page, I'm not entirely sure if this method still works.

If you do not wish to use YouTube's webform or you are submitting a counter-notice to a website other than YouTube, you can email a counter-notice to the site's copyright compliance address (in the case of YouTube, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ). The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) requires that a counter-notice contain the following specific elements, which are described on YouTube's help page here:

  1. Identification of the specific URLs of material that YouTube has removed or to which YouTube has disabled access.
  2. Your full name, address, telephone number, and email address, and the username of your YouTube account.
  3. The statement: "I consent to the jurisdiction of the Federal District Court for the district in which my address is located, or if my address is outside of the United States, the judicial district in which YouTube is located, and will accept service of process from the claimant."
  4. The statement: "I swear, under penalty of perjury, that I have a good faith belief that the material was removed or disabled as a result of a mistake or misidentification of the material to be removed or disabled."
  5. Signature. A scanned physical signature or a valid electronic signature will be accepted.

Note: YouTube also requires a statement of the rationale behind your counter-notice, or else they will reject the counter-notice. In the case of a fair use claim, a statement like that above saying why your video is fair use should be sufficient. Your rationale must be specific to your video, and not merely a generalized statement about fair use. YouTube also requires that counter-notices sent by email use the following subject line: "YouTube DMCA Counter-Notification."

If you do wish to write your own counter-notice, a sample counter-notification may be found at: http://www.chillingeffects.org/dmca/counter512.pdf. (That link is actually another counter-notice generator, which you can use to create a counter-notice when you can then email to YouTube.)

What Happens Next

Once you have submitted a counter-notification, the copyright owner has 10-14 business days to respond and notify YouTube that they plan to file a lawsuit seeking an injunction prohibiting you from posting your video (in most cases, highly unlikely). If they fail to do this within the allotted time (YouTube's policy says 10 days even though the law gives them up to 14), YouTube will restore your video. In my personal experience, this whole process takes about three weeks.

Please be aware that after you file a counter-notice, the only way the copyright owner can keep your video off YouTube is to sue you. While no regular YouTube user has yet been sued over a YouTube video, there is a possibility that filing a counter-notice could provoke them into filing a lawsuit. Please keep this risk in mind when deciding whether or not to file a counter-notice.

Troubleshooting

  • I filed a DMCA counter-notice through YouTube's webform, and I never received any confirmation message. It has been several weeks and nothing has happened.
    It seems that sometimes DMCA counter-notices submitted through YouTube's webform just get lost in the system. If this happens to you and you do not receive any kind of confirmation from YouTube within a few days, try submitting it again through the email method, by emailing all the same information in your counter-notice to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , using the subject line, "YouTube DMCA Counter-Notification."
  • I filed a DMCA counter-notice, but it was rejected with a message saying "Based on the information you have provided, it appears that you do not have the necessary rights to post the content on YouTube. Therefore, we regretfully cannot honor this counter-notification. It has not been forwarded to the original claimant, and we will not be able to restore your video."
    In my experience, this message results from one of two things: either (1) you already deleted the video you are attempting to file a counter-notice on; or (2) you failed to fill out the "message to YouTube" box in the counter-notice form and include an explanation for why your video is not infringing. If the first is true, I'm afraid you're simply out of luck, as YouTube will not process counter-notices on videos you have already deleted yourself. Never delete videos you plan to file a copyright dispute on!

    If the second is true, simply re-submit the counter-notice form, and include in the "message to YouTube" box a brief explanation for why your video is not infringing, that is specific to YOUR video. Generic statements about fair use are not sufficient. You have to explain why YOUR VIDEO specifically is fair use. For example, a statement like, "This video qualifies as fair use under U.S. copyright law because it (1) makes transformative use of the content in question, adding new message and meaning to the original; (2) is non-commercial in nature; and (3) does not harm the market for the original" should be sufficient.

One final note

The DMCA requires copyright owners to certify that they have a "good faith belief" that the material in question is infringing when filing a DMCA takedown notice. If a copyright owner files a takedown notice against a video that is clearly fair use or otherwise obviously non-infringing, they could be liable for fraudulent misrepresentation of the video's copyright status under the DMCA. There is at least one legal precedent (the case Lenz v. Universal in California) where a judge has ruled that a copyright owner could be held liable for issuing a fraudulent takedown notice against a 30-second home video of a toddler dancing to a Prince song being played on the radio. While the final outcome of the case has yet to be determined, this raises the possibility that if your video is falsely taken down even though it was obviously fair use, you could sue the copyright owner for damages. Please consult your attorney if you would like to pursue this option.

Last Updated on Sunday, 02 December 2012 21:28

 

Comments  

 
+6 #1 shini 2011-06-22 01:10
youtube disables my video after I disabute it and it was qualfied for disbute ._.
It was a fandub and I wrote evereything on descrebtion that I dont own the anime and all those stuff

and I got my video removed and I got a warning ._.

hate youtube copyrights U_U
 
 
+4 #2 Patricia 2012-03-31 15:22
The dispute process has changed - particularly the grounds on which users can dispute claims. One category in particular has been removed, that of "misidentificati on", which is used when music publishing rights holders make claims against (for example) wildlife videos which contain no other material than the natural environment. It appears that Google/YouTube wish to deter justified disputes by making the process arcane, so as to allow rights holders to raise revenue on unrelated videos :cry: I would love to know where to turn for advice.
 
 
0 #3 Patrick McKay 2012-03-31 16:06
Patricia, I need to update my tutorial, but even though that specific option is no longer available, there are others that accomplish basically the same thing. In this case of an outright mistaken match, you could either say "The video is my original content and I own all of the rights to it," or, "The content is in the public domain or is not eligible for copyright protection." Interestingly though, there does not appear to be an option that the material is copyrighted but owned by a different copyright owner than the claimant.
 
 
0 #4 Patricia 2012-03-31 18:55
Quoting Patrick McKay:
Interestingly though, there does not appear to be an option that the material is copyrighted but owned by a different copyright owner than the claimant.


Which is what applies in my case, and I would not be able to produce a licence from the owner/s, whose permission is tacit as long as they are acknowledged. (I'm not a legal person so my language is "lay".) I am surprised that there isn't more serious and educated discussion of this in the public domain.

If I cannot work this out it means that opportunist* claimants can freely advertise on videos when they have no right to. Galling!

*Footage of an osprey nest is said to contain material from a ringtone RIOU Octave Shift!

Thank you for your time, Patrick.
 
 
+2 #5 Roy Duran 2012-05-18 04:28
Just used this guide to dispute one of my videos that I had uploaded recently. Even though I had two versions of it uploaded, it is interesting is that they only claimed one of them.

I've had this happen in the past on a couple other AMVs, and was able to dispute them just as easily, although the procedure was slight different.

Thanks for the heads up on this, and for giving me (and other) creators the information we need in order to combat these claims.

I mean, I've had many fans of my videos go out and buy the anime/music that my videos showcase, and I'm not many any money whatsoever on the many hours of labor I've put into them. If anything, these companies should be thanking us for helping expose their material. ;p

Thanks again!
 
 
0 #6 Lorna 2012-06-09 11:14
Thanks for this guide. I'm using this to dispute one of the videos I've taken of a youth outreach program that teaches hip-hop, and was flagged by YouTube because one of the background songs that was played for their dance contains copyright material. I hope the fair use qualifies the video to be unblocked from the copyright flag.

I added credit to the copyright claimant in the description section just in case.
 
 
0 #7 Erica 2012-06-09 18:34
Just tried this with my Akatsuki ipod video and i hope it works! It took me a long time to make it and i don't think that i have another copy. I used every thing on here correctly and just hope it works. btw does any one know if downloading a song on loudtronix from youtube free count as buying it?
 
 
0 #8 Gen 2012-06-20 22:03
"YouTube will not process counter-notices on videos you have already deleted yourself. Never delete videos you plan to file a copyright dispute on! "
I don't think that's quite true; a few months ago I disputed a claim on a video I had deleted after receiving the strike, and it still went through and I won the case.

On another note, as anyone ever seen this version of the message? "We are concerned that you may be misusing our counter-notification process
and because of this, we are unable to honor this request. Please
understand that filing a counter-notification may result in the claimant
filing a lawsuit against you for copyright infringement."

This is the first time I received this message after filing a counter-notice, what do they mean by misusing? I filed the form as I did before. Guess I'll start over.
 
 
0 #9 Patrick McKay 2012-06-20 22:16
That message is quite concerning. It seems to indicate YouTube rejected your counter-notice out of hand based on their own evaluation it lacked merit, which is not what the DMCA says to do. The only time I've ever heard of that happening is if you failed to include a rationale for your dispute in the "message to YouTube box." Make sure you include a rationale, or write a different rationale than last time, and hopefully it should go through.
 
 
0 #10 Nik 2012-07-27 07:04
So if the claim has been released I am safe?
 
 
0 #11 Patrick McKay 2012-07-27 19:19
Typically yes.
 
 
0 #12 Mariana 2012-08-02 12:28
Hi! Thanks a lot for making this website!

I still have doubts, though.

Is it fair use to use music in a tutorial that has nothing to do with the song? For example a tutorial on how to sculpt hair, and I want to play a song.

Also, how do I know which songs I can use by adding the link to its iTunes?

Thanks for your time!
 
 
0 #13 Patrick McKay 2012-08-02 12:43
Using a song as pure background music rather than in a way that comments on or adds to the message of a song is probably not fair use because it wouldn't be considered transformative. So just using a song as background in a tutorial would sadly probably not be fair use. Hope that helps.
 
 
0 #14 Mariana 2012-08-02 18:33
Quoting Patrick McKay:
Using a song as pure background music rather than in a way that comments on or adds to the message of a song is probably not fair use because it wouldn't be considered transformative. So just using a song as background in a tutorial would sadly probably not be fair use. Hope that helps.


Oh, I see!

One last question and sorry if it's silly.

I'm just confused by Michelle Phan on You Tube, she makes videos of makeup and adds the iTunes link to the songs.

How does she do that? Does that mean she pays something to use them?
 
 
0 #15 Patrick McKay 2012-08-07 01:02
I really have no idea about Michelle Phan. Maybe she gets licenses for the music she uses or uses creative commons tracks. Or maybe she's technically infringing but the music labels tolerate her use and just don't block her videos. I couldn't say.
 
 
+1 #16 Ryu 2012-08-18 20:28
I have 2 accounts suspended/terminated for Youtube poop or mash up videos.The funny that happened is some of copyright owners had release their claims against my video after they were removed from Youtube and maybe even after the claims were released. So now what?
 
 
+1 #17 Patrick McKay 2012-08-19 23:39
That probably means they sent a DMCA notice after they released the Content ID claim. There's a contact form you can use to contact YouTube to find out why your account was terminated, and then you could send a DMCA counter-notice to get your account restored.
 
 
0 #18 Ryu 2012-08-21 08:27
Quoting Patrick McKay:
That probably means they sent a DMCA notice after they released the Content ID claim. There's a contact form you can use to contact YouTube to find out why your account was terminated, and then you could send a DMCA counter-notice to get your account restored.


I did sent out a counter notice about almost a month ago when I got those channel suspended,I haven't gotten a response yet other then the automated responses,I did sent counter notices while I had those channels but It didn't go through because I was so mad when those videos where removed that I said thing I shouldn't. The funny thing was one counter notice went through for one of same video I made that put on a different account.
 
 
0 #19 Patrick McKay 2012-08-21 11:42
Well then maybe you should try sending another counter-notice, and just make sure to do this one properly this time.
 
 
0 #20 Ryu 2012-08-24 05:46
Quoting Patrick McKay:
Well then maybe you should try sending another counter-notice, and just make sure to do this one properly this time.

I did but I'm still waiting on them,It was WMG that released the claim after it was removed on Youtube.It did let Google know about it on their help forum but no real response about what they're gonna do yet.
One account for one of my videos had 2 different claimants.First I can believe UMG but NFL,claim one of my YouTube poop videos which there was no sports footage used at all. I forgot that I did sent out counter notices.I don't mean to send out that many but I just want get my point across to Youtube and those copyright owners.
 
 
0 #21 Ryu 2012-08-29 12:02
Ok,I did spoke to a copyright attorney,for that matter but I don't really want to go to court for it *sigh* I think have to one the count of how many counter notices,I sent.Why couldn't they just release all the claims?
 
 
0 #22 Ryu 2012-08-30 05:32
I did spoke people on Google help forums but wasn't a help on there,saying my videos don't count as a mash up because it's not transfromative enough to him but it enough for WMG and others to release their copyright.
 
 
0 #23 Marissa 2012-09-19 11:32
ok..... so i wanna submit the dispute....
i wont get sued after i dispute the copyrgiht right ?? or is that only for filing a counter notice ??? pls answer me ASAP !!!
thkns
 
 
0 #24 Patrick McKay 2012-09-19 22:35
Really you are highly unlikely to get sued if you dispute either way, though I suppose it might be a bit more likely with a counter-notice than a Content ID dispute. It is still always a theoretical possibility at any stage in the process though.
 
 
0 #25 Anonim 2012-09-20 08:08
What should I do if my video was removed one time,I filed the counter-notice, the video was restored and after a month was taken down again?
 
 
0 #26 Ryu 2012-09-20 09:24
Quoting Anonim:
What should I do if my video was removed one time,I filed the counter-notice, the video was restored and after a month was taken down again?


I would file another one but also state to copyright holders but specify why it is fair use and that they shouldn't file another DMCA take down notice just because they didn't respond within the slotted time.
 
 
0 #27 Patrick McKay 2012-09-20 18:50
Right. Really all you can do is file another DMCA counter-notice (assuming that's how it was taken down, not by Content ID).
 
 
0 #28 Ryu 2012-09-20 20:00
I wonder if sending the counter notice directly to copyright holders would work instead sending it Youtube,I hadn't gotten any word on them other then being queued for review by YouTube copyright team, it been a little over 2 months for my case.
 
 
+1 #29 Patrick McKay 2012-09-21 00:44
Sometimes it seems YouTube just doesn't get them or misses them or something. You just have to keep trying. Try both the webform and emailing them directly at copyright@youtu be.com. Emailing the copyright holders directly would be even less likely to produce any result.
 
 
0 #30 Ryu 2012-09-21 01:33
Quoting Patrick McKay:
Sometimes it seems YouTube just doesn't get them or misses them or something. You just have to keep trying. Try both the webform and emailing them directly at copyright@youtu be.com. Emailing the copyright holders directly would be even less likely to produce any result.


I guess so,I don't know how many I sent through the email.I think maybe about 100 or so. But no word whether they been forwarded or not. They should've at least foward it once it's been queued to copyright team,I don't how long it takes to for them to do so through email.
 
 
0 #31 Patrick McKay 2012-09-21 07:59
Hmm, I don't know what to tell you then. Every time I've sent a counter-notice I always got some kind of confirmation within a few days. No idea why it's not working for you. Are you sure you're using the right email address (the same as your YouTube account) and sending them all the required information?
 
 
0 #32 Ryu 2012-09-21 11:47
Quoting Patrick McKay:
Hmm, I don't know what to tell you then. Every time I've sent a counter-notice I always got some kind of confirmation within a few days. No idea why it's not working for you. Are you sure you're using the right email address (the same as your YouTube account) and sending them all the required information?


I'm sure I did used the emails that were associated with those accounts. So now what?
 
 
0 #33 Ryu 2012-09-21 20:40
The one with NFL being the claimant didn't go through,I got an email from Youtube being concerned that I was "abusing" the counter notice when I'm trying to sort out a mix up of claimants. UMG is proper claimant not UMG.The sad thing is I forgot to make screen caps of it.
 
 
0 #34 Patrick McKay 2012-09-22 00:25
Well if YouTube rejects your counter-notice it generally means you need to have a better specific explanation of why your video is fair use. I think a lot of people just cut and paste a generic statement about fair use that doesn't say anything about their video, so they make you jump through that extra hoop. All I can really say is keep trying.
 
 
+1 #35 Ryu 2012-09-22 04:33
Quoting Patrick McKay:
Well if YouTube rejects your counter-notice it generally means you need to have a better specific explanation of why your video is fair use. I think a lot of people just cut and paste a generic statement about fair use that doesn't say anything about their video, so they make you jump through that extra hoop. All I can really say is keep trying.

Quoting Patrick McKay:
Well if YouTube rejects your counter-notice it generally means you need to have a better specific explanation of why your video is fair use. I think a lot of people just cut and paste a generic statement about fair use that doesn't say anything about their video, so they make you jump through that extra hoop. All I can really say is keep trying.


Yeah,you're right.I decided not share with Google help forums.I think other users are gonna chastise me again because my videos aren't transformative enough and that fact I used the whole work but it goes the heart of it. One of example of mine is inverting hue that artist would look blue and I raised the pitch to make them look and sound like Smurf just make example.
 
 
0 #36 Ryu 2012-09-25 02:15
I think got those counter notice correctly. I think I was leaving off some minor details and stuff. I hope it works.
 
 
0 #37 Patricia 2012-10-05 09:13
According to GHacks newsletter YouTube's dispute process has been updated/improved. I can testify that one of the 2 remaining confirmed claims (out of HUNDREDS that I've disputed) today had an APPEAL link on it and I've been thru the process. The other video doesn't have an appeal link though :-(

I hope this link to the GHacks article works, I have not yet investigated further on Google's tortuous forums.

http://www.ghacks.net/2012/10/04/youtube-improves-content-removal-process/?_m=3n.0038.662.kh0ao01p0t.og3
 
 
0 #38 Patrick McKay 2012-10-05 13:45
Yes YouTube has updated the process and I actually wrote a blog post about the new appeals process yesterday. I will be updating this guide to reflect the new system as soon as it is fully rolled out. I haven't actually seen any appeals links show up on my videos yet. I'll have to see if I can personally go through the appeals process before I'll be able to write a tutorial for it.
 
 
0 #39 GB 2012-10-06 11:29
Where can I read your blog post? What is the appeal ??
 
 
0 #40 WM 2012-10-06 14:48
After my video has been restored, how long will YouTube save the personal data I've provided (my address for example)?
 

Due to excessive spam, comments have been disabled for the time being. I hope to upgrade the site soon with a new comment system that can filter out spam.